Aug 242012
 

I’ve been stuck in one place on Cap for a long time.  Been trying to get my seams in right, but every time I re-prime the model, it always turns out I’ve missed a spot, or it was rough, or not shaped right.  It always looks good until it gets a new base coat.  Bear in mind, this isn’t the actual model that I’m talking about.  I’m referring to my own work where the arms and legs join the body.  After gluing and puttying, it just took a lot of work to finally call it done.  It may not be perfect, but it’s the best I can manage.

So finally, a chance to paint!  Working with my Badger Anthem (I’m really new to the airbrush thing) I started on the extremities.  Gloves, boots, and belt packs.  Wanted them all in brown leather.  This model kit is resin, titled Captain America: the Ultimate Soldier.  It’s done in an old costume design, during Cap’s time in World War II.  As such, his costume really lends itself to a grittier, more realistic color scheme.  I’ve seen other hobbyists work with brown, and with red gloves, and the brown just really looks good.  Natural dark leather.

My first attempt, using the Badger, went really well.  Except for the final brush-painted layer.  In trying to achieve a highlight, I went with a too-light color of brown for the dry brushing.  Took it back to that comic-book feel.  This is where the airbrush really stood out.  Rather than start over, I loaded up his base color (a mix of Espresso and Black), thinned it down, and sprayed a light wash over everything until the tones were shaded back down.  Then I used a much more appropriate mix of Espresso/brown/antique white and drybrushed again.  Came out far better!

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After that, a touch of black leather for the boot soles, and that part was done.  Next up was something completely new for me.  Monique and I’ve been watching Phil Lister and David Fisher’s video modeling series of videos.  We’ve learned a ton from both videos, but in Model Mania (David Fisher’s dvd) he recommended protecting finished areas with Mold Builder.  Monique already tried it with her Elvira kit, and was very happy.  So now the Mold Builder is going all over Cap’s shoes, gloves, and leather packs.  When it’s finished, I can paint the rest of the model without worrying about messing up previous work.

Just to clear it up a bit, Mold Building is not intrinsically meant for protecting paint from being painted over.  It’s actual purpose is during the making of a mold from an original sculpt or carving.  Multiple layers over time create a kind of rubbery encasement, and when it’s peeled off, you have a mold of the original.  I’ve never learned much about sculpting and creating molds, so I couldn’t tell you what happens beyond that.  For me, it’s enough to know it can be used to help me paint my resin model kit.  When I’m done with it, the rubbery texture can be very carefully peeled off, leaving my paint safe and pristine.  In theory.  I’ll find out soon enough!

He’s got one more boot to go, but it’s too late tonight to finish.  Tomorrow’s Friday, with any luck the boot will be done and dry tomorrow, and the weekend will be a great time to start on the next major colors!

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